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Adapting to Twitter Changes

Adapting to Twitter Changes

By on Aug 19, 2016 in Social Media Writing, Twitter | 0 comments

It’s especially frustrating when you thought you were finally getting a handle on the nuances and starting to make headway on reaching your best audience. This has happened with Twitter which said recently it will be making two alterations. The first is a move to reduce the number of notifications that pop up. It will be limited to those from people you’re following. That’s great news for Twitter users inundated and numb from pop-up notifications, but those who are relying on those pop-up notifications to reach people are not doing the happy dance. The second is aimed at reducing harassment. The quality filters that have been used by celebs and well-known people are now open to all. As the folks at Twitter explained: When turned on, the filter can improve the quality of Tweets you see by using a variety of signals, such as account origin and behavior. Turning it on filters lower-quality content, like duplicate Tweets or content that appears to be automated, from your notifications and other parts of your Twitter experience. It does not filter content from people you follow or accounts you’ve recently interacted with — and depending on your preferences, you can turn it on or off in your notifications settings. Change Your Tactics This is actually a positive move for many marketers. Keep in mind that this is a social platform. The goal of a credible marketer is to build relationships not to shout at people.  This will eliminate competitors who are doing just that and turning people off of Twitter. It is now even more important to consider how to build relationships with Twitter users who are or may become your fans, supporters and customers. Some things to keep in mind: Share information and media that is relevant to the audience you want to reach. Think in terms of putting out information that they can share and send to their audience. Be sincere. Don’t harass your audience. Reach out and be personable with your audience. Notice that quality filters allow content from followers and accounts that have had recent interactions. Interactions have always been good. You can still use apps to put out content and you should still monitor and analyze the effect...

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Tips to Navigate the Twitter Jungle

Tips to Navigate the Twitter Jungle

By on Jan 13, 2016 in Twitter | 1 comment

How much can you really accomplish with just 140 characters? Quite a bit more than you might think. With just a few words and a bit of strategy, you can reach thousands of prospects and spread your message around the world in a very short time. Twitter may seem at first like a jumbled, confusing impenetrable jungle, but push on and you can hack a clear path. Recently, my path on Twitter led me to Michael T. Sheen, an artist in Utah who designs websites for authors and other artists. He also organizes writers’ conferences with his partner, international best-selling author and writer’s coach Angie Fenimore. (They’re having one this weekend ) This post is an indication of the potential of Twitter. Here’s how it worked in this case: Something Michael wrote caught my eye, so I checked out his bio and was intrigued enough to go to his website. Then, I emailed to ask if we could talk so I could learn about his online strategy. I found his story to be fascinating, and now I’m writing about it, giving him even more exposure. Before I contacted Michael, I noted that he had more than 5,000 visitors. I wasn’t surprised because he had a succinct, focused Twitter bio and an inviting, clear website. What I didn’t know was that just over a month ago, he had only 12 Twitter followers and not one of his new followers came from paying to boost posts or promote his page. He did put in some intensive effort and strategic planning, but it wasn’t particularly complicated. Here are some tips he offered to help you build your own audience: Be clear on who you want to reach and why. The more you understand about who you want to reach, the more direct you can be in your Tweets, and the more your target audience will be interested in what you have to say. Post. Michael puts up 2 to 3 posts a day. About 40 percent of them are his own thoughts and comments, the rest are curated. He finds things he thinks his audience will be interested in and re-posts them. Be attentive. Michael uses a service to send out an automatic...

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Time for Twitter

By on Jul 10, 2012 in Twitter, Uncategorized | 4 comments

Question: There is a lot of talk about Twitter and how important it can be for a small business. Does it really matter? Answer: It depends. It can be a great place to both get and give info. It’s a matter of how you use it. The other day I was out on a boat with friends on a hunt for tall ships that were supposedly coming to anchor near Niantic, Connecticut. There were plenty of boats around but none of the tall ship variety. There was however, an extremely large military ship surrounded by a small armada of Coast Guard boats making sure no one came too close.  Curious about the boat and the location of our elusive prey, I turned to Twitter. A search on “Niantic” and “tall ships” revealed a Tweet about a pending “mock invasion” of the small coastal city. The tweet led to a newspaper article that said the military vessel contained a huge hover craft on which there was a Humvee and a large number of troops that were going to shore to show off. Not only that, we found out that the extravaganza was just about to start. Couldn’t I have just found out about this from a Google search? Maybe, but Twitter offers the added benefit of offering up-to-the-minute  info as well as links to other resources. There might have been more Tweets from other boaters or event sponsors with more details. I doubt you are planning any military invasions and perhaps you aren’t hunting for small ships. But whether you are selling coffee or cotton candy,  Twitter can be a way for you to connect with customers. You can find out what they’re interested in and you can get your message to them.   It’s a matter of developing a good strategy and figuring out how to make it happen.  In a recent blog post small business owner Jeanne Rossomme offers some great tips on how to make time for...

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All a Twit about Twitter – post for Twitter neophytes

By on May 30, 2012 in Twitter | 0 comments

I pledge to you that I will never Tweet about what I had for breakfast or that I’m stuck in the longest line in the Target and the guy in front actually managed to pick up the only two lawn chairs without a price tag forcing the need for a ridiculously long price check. Why would you care anyway? In fact, why would you care about anything on Twitter? Honestly, there are a lot of things written that you probably don’t care about. But don’t write it off just yet. If used well, Twitter can be a great communication tool. If you’re not sure, start slowly. In this case, the first step would be to sign up and start “following” people to get a sense of what’s going on. The key is in who you select to follow. Choose wisely and you will get a stream of relevant headlines that are of interest to you. Choose poorly and you’re wasting your time reading about pop tarts and slow check out clerks and wondering why so many people think Twitter is so great. It’s not too hard to find what you’re looking for. Do a search of people using they key words like news, small business, or orange groves – whatever you want to know about. You’ll get a list of Tweeters. Read a few posts by those who look interesting to see if you like what they’re writing about. There is a school of thought that if you follow a lot of people it will help you build your follower base. To me, that is advanced Tweeting – we can get to that later. Right now, concentrate on quality over quantity or you risk getting an overwhelming stream of information. You may have noticed that I’m not talking about your Tweeting, which is why most people sign up, right? That’s important too, but that’s the next step. For now, this will help you find some value in Twitter without too much effort. My twitter handle is @jenjournalist. Although I signed up a long time ago when people were trying to figure out if we tweet or twit, I held of tweeting for a long time because, quite honestly, I...

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